Rosetta Stone Language Software

First Conversation in Sanskrit - Part II (f)

Ashok makes an inquiry as to how you are doing:

Bhavatyaah kushalam asti va? – Your welfare is (taken care of)?

There’s bhavatyaah – your for a woman – again. You answer:

Mama kushalam asti – my welfare is, to indicate you are fine.

You ask Ashok, in turn, using bhavatah because he is a man:

Bhavatah kushalam asti – your welfare is? He answers:

Mama kushalam asti – my welfare is.

You realize that Ashok might have other obligations, and that you might as well. So, though you do not rush, but are calm, still you take leave with a standard closing:

Punar milaamah. – Until we see each other again.

Punar milaamah, he answers.

Ashok smiles, turns, and disappears down the path. You sense that it is time for you to return as well, and head back along your path.

As you go, you replay the conversation in your mind, first translating the ideas, if not the words, to keep it straight in your mind:

Namo namah – Greetings

Namo namah – Greetings

Bhavatah naama kim? – What is your name? (to a man).

Mama naama Ashok. – My name is Ashok.

Bhavatyaah naama kim? – What is your name? (to a woman).

Mama naama… your name. – My name is…

Bhavatyaah kushalam asti va? – How are you? (to a woman).

Mama kushalam ast. – I’m fine.

Bhavatah kushalam asti va? – How are you? (to a man).

Mama kushalam asti. – I’m fine.

Punar milaamah. – Goodbye.

Punar milaamah. – Goodbye.

And as you keep walking, you replay it one more time, just in Sanskrit:

Namo namah.

Namo namah.

Bhavayaah naama kim?

Mama naama Ashok. Bhavatyaah naama kim?

Mama naama… your name.

Bhavatyaah kushalam asti va?

Mama kushalam asti. Bhavatah kushalam asti va?

Mama kushalam asti.

Punar milaamah.

Punar milaamah.

And just now, you are getting back to where you started, and your lesson is just about over. So smile. You have just had your first conversation in Sanskrit. And now you are ready to resume your day on the count of 1… and 2… and 3.

First Conversation in Sanskrit - Part I (f)

You want to greet Ashok, and without thinking, you greet him by saying:

Namo namah – Greetings.

Namo namah – Greetings – he answers in kind.

You want to know his name for certain, so you inquire:

Bhavatah naama kim? – Your name (is) what?

Because he is a man, the question starts with bhavatah.

He takes in the question, Bhavatah naama kim? and answers,

Mama naama Ashok – My name (is) Ashok.

You are processing this, and realize that to give your name, you would say,

Mama naama, followed by your name.

You wonder if you should say it, when he warmly asks,

Bhavatyaah naama kim? = Your name (is) what?

Because you are a woman, the question started bhavatyaah. You make a mental note…

To ask a man’s name, you say:

Bhavatah naama kim?

To ask a woman’s name, you say:

Bhavatyaah naama kim?

As you’re taking this in, you realize you should answer the question, so you say:

Mama naama… and finish with your name.

Ashok waits patiently for you to process what you have learned, and you take advantage, by replaying the conversation so far in your mind:

Namo namah.

Namo namah.

Bhavatah naama kim?

Mama Ashok. Bhavatyaah naama kim?

Mama naama… end with your name…

Ashok waits patiently for you to process what you have learned, and you take advantage, by replaying the conversation so far in your mind:

Namo namah.

Namo namah.

Bhavatah naama kim?

Mama naama Ashok. Bhavatyaah naama kim?

Mama naama… end with your name…

Click here to keep talking

First Conversation in Sanskrit -f

To be read aloud, or sounded out in your mind:

Learning Sanskrit is both a challenge and an adventure. Its structure is different from English, which means you can’t just translate word by word. But when you’re exposed to it, if you just let the words come, you will see intuitively how the phrases you are learning come together.

Learning languages is an exciting thing to do. It’s also something you’re good at. Because language is merely making sounds and putting them in the right order. In this short program, you are going to get your toes wet, like dipping them into a vast pool of language. But when you are done, you will have had an imaginary conversation in perfectly good Sanskrit, one that you will be able to have again in real life should you choose, and should you find a Sanskrit speaker, of course. So now let’s count to three, then have our conversation.

And 1) sit back, relax, and let the words go by and before you know it they’ll be sinking in. Just keep reading, but as you are reading, you can take a little stroll along a garden path. And maybe you should perk your ears to hear fountains trickling in the background. And let your mind open to an expanse of green in front of you. You can learn wherever you want, of course, but learning in a nice, lush, lovely garden would be a nice place to learn, wouldn’t it.

And 2) Let the words go by, and enjoy the nice lovely garden, and take a nice walk along the path that goes through that garden. As you are walking amongst the bushes, and the flowers, walking along the path, you will come to a place where the path forks. If you follow the path to the left, you will meet a nice young lady.

And 3) Once you have turned left, and have walked about twenty feet, you meet Ashok. His face is kind, and welcoming, and you are glad to be meeting him. And now, something magical will happen. When you meet Ashok, you will speak Sanskrit with him. And because you are ready, the time to talk to him is now.

Click here to start talking

First Conversation in Sanskrit - Part II

Devi makes an inquiry as to how you are doing:

Bhavatah kushalam asti va? – Your welfare is (taken care of)?

There’s bhavatah – your for a man – again. You answer:

Mama kushalam asti – my welfare is, to indicate you are fine.

You ask Devi, in turn, using bhavatyaah because she is a woman:

Bhavatyaah kushalam asti – your welfare is? She answers:

Mama kushalam asti – my welfare is.

You realize that Devi might have other obligations, and that you might as well. So, though you do not rush, but are calm, still you take leave with a standard closing:

Punar milaamah. – Until we see each other again.

Punar milaamah, she answers.

Devi smiles, turns, and disappears down the path. You sense that it is time for you to return as well, and head back along your path.

As you go, you replay the conversation in your mind, first translating the ideas, if not the words, to keep it straight in your mind:

Namo namah – Greetings

Namo namah – Greetings

Bhavatyaah naama kim? – What is your name? (to a woman).

Mama naama Devi. – My name is Devi.

Bhavatah naama kim? – What is your name? (to a man).

Mama naama… your name. – My name is…

Bhavatah kushalam asti va? – How are you? (to a man).

Mama kushalam ast. – I’m fine.

Bhavatyaah kushalam asti va? – How are you? (to a woman).

Mama kushalam asti. – I’m fine.

Punar milaamah. – Goodbye.

Punar milaamah. – Goodbye.

And as you keep walking, you replay it one more time, just in Sanskrit:

Namo namah.

Namo namah.

Bhavayaah naama kim?

Mama naama Devi. Bhavatah naama kim?

Mama naama… your name.

Bhavatah kushalam asti va?

Mama kushalam asti. Bhavatyaah kushalam asti va?

Mama kushalam asti.

Punar milaamah.

Punar milaamah.

And just now, you are getting back to where you started, and your lesson is just about over. So smile. You have just had your first conversation in Sanskrit. And now you are ready to resume your day on the count of 1… and 2… and 3.

First Conversation in Sanskrit - Part I

You want to greet Devi, and without thinking, you greet her by saying:

Namo namah – Greetings.

Namo namah – Greetings – she answers in kind.

You want to know her name, so you inquire:

Bhavatyaah naama kim? – Your name (is) what?

Because she is a woman, the question starts with bhavatyaah.

She takes in the questions, Bhavatyaah naama kim? and answers,

Mama naama Devi – My name (is) Devi.

You are processing this, and realize that to give your name, you would say,

Mama naama, followed by your name.

You wonder if you should say it, when she warmly asks,

Bhavatah naama kim? = Your name (is) what?

Because you are a man, the question started bhavatah. You make a mental note…

To ask a woman’s name, you say:

Bhavatyaah naama kim?

To ask a man’s name, you say:

Bhavatah naama kim?

As you’re taking this in, you realize you should answer the question, so you say:

Mama naama… and finish with your name.

Devi waits patiently for you to process what you have learned, and you take advantage, by replaying the conversation so far in your mind:

Namo namah.

Namo namah.

Bhavatyaah naama kim?

Mama naama Devi. Bhavatah naama kim?

Mama naama… end with your name…

Click to keep talking

Sanskrit Conversation - Preparation

To be read aloud, or sounded out in your mind:

Learning Sanskrit is both a challenge and an adventure. Its structure is different from English, which means you can’t just translate word by word. But when you’re exposed to it, if you just let the words come, you will see intuitively how the phrases you are learning come together.

Learning languages is an exciting thing to do. It’s also something you’re good at. Because language is merely making sounds and putting them in the right order. In this short program, you are going to get your toes wet, like dipping them into a vast pool of language. But when you are done, you will have had an imaginary conversation in perfectly good Sanskrit, one that you will be able to have again in real life should you choose, and should you find a Sanskrit speaker, of course. So now let’s count to three, then have our conversation.

And 1) sit back, relax, and let the words go by and before you know it they’ll be sinking in. Just keep reading, but as you are reading, you can take a little stroll along a garden path. And maybe you should perk your ears to hear fountains trickling in the background. And let your mind open to an expanse of green in front of you. You can learn wherever you want, of course, but learning in a nice, lush, lovely garden would be a nice place to learn, wouldn’t it.

And 2) Let the words go by, and enjoy the nice lovely garden, and take a nice walk along the path that goes through that garden. As you are walking amongst the bushes, and the flowers, walking along the path, you will come to a place where the path forks. If you follow the path to the left, you will meet a nice young lady.

And 3) Once you have turned left, and have walked about twenty feet, you meet Devi. Her face is kind, and welcoming, and you are glad to be meeting her. And now, something magical will happen. When you meet Devi, you will speak Sanskrit with her. And because you are ready, the time to talk to her is now.

Click to start talking

First Conversation in Sanskrit

This program will teach you to have a very short conversation in Sanskrit. When you are done, you will be able to exchange greetings, ask how someone is doing, exchange names and take your leave of someone.

The program may seem somewhat unusual in its language and structure. It is intended to put you in a frame of mind where you can sort of pick up the language, as opposed to making a conscientious effort to learn. The key is not to study, but to read the passage, out loud, two or three times over the course of one or two days.

The program is not hypnotic language learning, per se, but it does make use of elements of self-hypnotic induction, so that you can treat the language as something to live, rather than as an object to study.

Because Sanskrit makes extensive use of vocabulary that varies according to the gender of the speaker or the person being spoken to, there are two versions:

In one version, the subject of the lesson (you) is a male, and the other character, Devi, is a female.

In the other version, the subject of the lesson (you) is a female, and the other character, Ashok, is a male.

Both versions will expose you to the masculine and feminine forms, but with the emphasis slightly shifted so that male and female visitors will know what to listen for when being spoken to.

Click to begin (males) - Click to begin (females)